Chance The Rapper's The Big Day: Review

There was a time when Chance The Rapper miraculously claimed to be Kanye West’s best protégé, high expectations met with a failed reality. The Big Day was intended to be greater than what Chance has accomplished but it wasn’t so big at all. 


Balancing the ideology of street and book smarts, Chance has become the champion of positivity. A gimmick that has become uninspired as of late and has allowed the rapper to settle with releasing PG rap music that has alienated his core base, while polarizing genre fans. Curated as a Graduation moment, The Big Day caters to the wrong crowd, and aims its focus to those hip cool dads, and soccer moms. Waving goodbye to his rebel youth that inspired the sounds of 12 Day and Acid Rap, Chance steps into fatherhood, and settling down, a concept that fans aren’t familiar with.

But the issue with the album doesn’t stem from its subject matter, but for the fact that it doesn’t explore beyond such subjects, and relies on Chance refusing to step out of his comfort zone. The main focus point of the album is three things, God, Jesus, and his Wife, but Chance doesn’t go in depth of the significance of those three figures, but rather plasters them as the inspiration for the album, but without the perspective of why they’re all significant to this chapter in his life. It's a bad album, with nothing noteworthy to dissect or analyze, or to actually review. A lazy effort that'll leave a long-lasting impression onto Chance's career, it's sort of like a bad political campaign, like that one time Hilary Clinton went to The Breakfast Club, or her cringeworthy commercial with Mary J Blige. 

It’s time we stop giving Chance The Rapper a pass for his positivity. Utilizing an uplifting persona as a shield for his mediocrity, Chance’s career is strategically catered for success and numbers. I mean, why else would a rapper release his “debut” album, strategically with 22 tracks, in the streaming era, just one month before the 2020 Grammys submissions deadline? The debate on the outlook of positivity being considered “corny” is one-sided, there’s no issue with being happy, and releasing uplifting-motivational music, Chance used to be creative with the themes of his previous releases, remaining creative while proving thought-provoking storytelling, now it’s a desperate attempt aimed at the wrong crowd. For so long, hip-hop has generally relied on reliability, but how can anyone relate to a manufactured, Nickelodeon, Steve from Blues Clues type of rap figure, who claims to be happy all the time? 

This album was bad, this “review” was pretty bad, but hey, if Chance The Rapper is fulfilled with his life, that’s all that matters.  

3 comments

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Victor

Hahaha love it

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